Review: See Me (See Me #1) by Wendy Higgins

See MeTitle: See Me
Author: Wendy Higgins
Series: See Me #1
Rating: 3 stars
Genres: Paranormal Romance
Links:

Blurb:
While most seventeen-year-old American girls would refuse to let their parents marry them off to a stranger, Robyn Mason dreams of the mysterious McKale in Ireland, wondering how he’ll look and imagining his cute Irish accent. Prearranged bindings are common for magical families like her own, however when she travels to the whimsical Emerald Isle she discovers there’s more to her betrothal and McKale’s clan than she was led to believe.

What starts as an obligatory pairing between Robyn and McKale morphs over time into something they both need. But one giant obstacle stands in the way of their budding romance: a seductive and deadly Fae princess accustomed to getting what she wants—and what she wants is McKale as her plaything. Love, desire, and jealousies collide as Robyn’s family and McKale’s clan must work together to outsmart the powerful Faeries and preserve the only hope left for their people.

My Review:
I really wanted to enjoy this book as I adore Wendy’s Sweet Trilogy. Perhaps that’s part of the problem, I had set my expectations too high. This book just didn’t grab me at all. It was still an enjoyable enough read, but not really my cup of tea. It pains me to have to write this review.

The writing is excellent as I’ve come to expect from Wendy, so there wasn’t an issue with the words on the page. I also felt it flowed well and I liked the description of the world; I could clearly visualize the fae and leprechaun worlds.

Cass and Rock made this book for me – they were fun and unpredictable and always up to mischief.

The big issues I had were with the plot and the characters.

I felt that Robyn was very flawed as a character. On the one hand, she is this popular, modern-day, feisty girl who plays football and isn’t afraid to hustle the guys. Yet, she accepts her arranged marriage to a guy she’s never met without question. When they arrive in the leprechaun village, it’s like stepping back into the Dark Ages but apart from one comment about the electricity, she never mentions it again! Realistically she would have struggled to fit in, but that’s not how it pans out.

McKale had no personality and he was in no way sexy or alluring as the male lead. I just couldn’t relate to the attraction between them as there seemed to be no reason for Robyn to fall for him, other than obligation.

The Fae are presented as the evil villains of the piece, yet this was without substance. And the Fae princess falling for gormless McKale? Not believable in the slightest.

The leprechauns are presented as very stereo-typical Irish (Orish) and, as an Irish native, it grated on my nerves at times. Thankfully, early on Wendy made a point of saying how different the leprechauns were to the normal Irish people the characters had met in Dublin Airport. Thank you for making that differentiation Wendy! If you hadn’t I would have given up on this book, but instead I took how the leprechauns spoke and acted as tongue-in-cheek, which I think is how it was intended.

All in all I was disappointed with this book but it won’t stop me picking up another of Wendy’s books. It just wasn’t my thing.If you enjoy folklore-type fantasy then you will most likely enjoy this book.

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