Review: The Return (Titan #1) by Jennifer L. Armentrout

The ReturnTitle: The Return
Author: Jennifer L. Armentrout
Series: Titan #1
Rating: 5 Stars
Genres: New Adult Paranormal
Links:

Blurb:

The Fates are cackling their bony asses off…

It’s been a year since Seth made the deal with the gods that pledged his life to them. And so far, the jobs they’ve given him have been violent and bloody–which is kind of all right with him. But now Apollo has something else in mind for Seth. He’s got to play protector while keeping his hands and fingers off, and for someone who really has a problem with restraint, this new assignment might be the most challenging yet.

Josie has no idea what this crazy hot guy’s deal might be, but it’s a good bet that his arrival means the new life she started after leaving home is about to be thrown into an Olympian-sized blender turned up to puree. Either Josie is going insane or a nightmare straight out of ancient myth is gunning for her.

But it might be the unlikely attraction simmering between her and the golden-eyed, secret-keeping Seth that may prove to be the most dangerous thing of all.

Because history has once again been flipped to repeat.

My Review:

Yesterday I helped reveal the cover for The Power, Book 2 in the Titan Series, so I felt it was fitting to post my review of The Return today.

I was on a countdown for this book and I often find where I’m anxiously anticipating something it doesn’t live up to my expectation. Thankfully, in the case of The Return, it did.

I loved how JLA wrapped up Sentinel for Alex & Aiden, but was heartsick for Seth, so this book was the perfect remedy.

Seth has undoubtedly been affected by the choices he has made over the course of the last couple of years. The burden weighs heavy on his shoulders. Enter Josie, daughter of Apollo, and things start to get interesting. She shares some physical and personality traits with Alex and Seth is floored at the start. However, as they get to know one another he begins to develop feelings for her, in a way he has never felt before. Seth continues to harbor horrific guilt over Alex, so much so that he often finds it difficult to even say her name. I really felt for the guy.

One of the reasons why I loved the Covenent series so much was Jennifer’s ability to seamlessly blend action, adventure, and romance. The Return was a little light on the action in the first half, and I would have liked a little more. That said, it didn’t dent my enjoyment.

I loved the fact that Deacon, Luke, Apollo and Marcus all feature in this book. It was so great to catch up with some of my favorite characters.

The writing, as usual, is sublime. 

An excellent read – for fans of the Covenent series, or as a standalone series. My only problem now is this: I NEED THE NEXT BOOK!!

Cover Reveal: The Power by Jennifer L Armentrout

Today is the cover reveal for The Power, the second book in Jennifer L Armentrout’s Titan series. I am really exicted to share this cover with you today as I’m a massive fan of Jennifer’s work and I loved the first book in this series. I’d highly recommend that you check it out!

Power

The Power (Titan #2)
by Jennifer L. Arementrout

Genre: New Adult Paranormal
You can add The Power to your to-read list on Goodreads

First book in the series:
The ReturnThe Return (Titan #1)
by Jennifer L. Armentrout

Genre: New Adult Paranormal

Blurb:
The Fates are cackling their bony asses off…

It’s been a year since Seth made the deal with the gods that pledged his life to them. And so far, the jobs they’ve given him have been violent and bloody–which is kind of all right with him. But now Apollo has something else in mind for Seth. He’s got to play protector while keeping his hands and fingers off, and for someone who really has a problem with restraint, this new assignment might be the most challenging yet.

Josie has no idea what this crazy hot guy’s deal might be, but it’s a good bet that his arrival means the new life she started after leaving home is about to be thrown into an Olympian-sized blender turned up to puree. Either Josie is going insane or a nightmare straight out of ancient myth is gunning for her.

But it might be the unlikely attraction simmering between her and the golden-eyed, secret-keeping Seth that may prove to be the most dangerous thing of all.

Because history has once again been flipped to repeat.

Links:

JLA_Author-photoJennifer L. Armentrout/J.Lynn Bio:
# 1 NEW YORK TIMES and USA TODAY Bestselling author Jennifer lives in Martinsburg, West Virginia. All the rumors you’ve heard about her state aren’t true. When she’s not hard at work writing. she spends her time reading, working out, watching really bad zombie movies, pretending to write, and hanging out with her husband and her Jack Russell Loki.

Her dreams of becoming an author started in algebra class, where she spent most of her time writing short stories….which explains her dismal grades in math. Jennifer writes young adult paranormal, science fiction, fantasy, and contemporary romance. She is published with Spencer Hill Press, Entangled Teen and Brazen, Disney/Hyperion and Harlequin Teen. Her book Obsidian has been optioned for a major motion picture and her Covenant Series has been optioned for TV.

She also writes adult and New Adult romance under the name J. Lynn. She is published by Entangled Brazen and HarperCollins.

Links:
Website
Twitter
Facebook
Jennifer L. Armentrout Goodreads

InkSlinger Blogger Final

Is it wrong for adults to read young adult literature?

There has been a lot of controversial articles, blogs, posts and heated online discussions over the course of the last year on the topic of adults reading literature intended for young adults. I was particularly incensed by this inflammatory article  in Slate.

As an author of young adult fiction and an avid reader of the genre, I wanted to share my thoughts on this rather heated subject matter.

It’s only fair that I should point out upfront that this post comes with a pretty hefty ‘rant warning’.  You have been forewarned!

Eighty percent of my time, I am a responsible wife, mother, employee and quite strait-laced! I relish the other twenty percent where I give in to my inner-teenager and indulge my passion for teenage books, music, and movies. For me, it is pure escapism and a way to chill-out. I think life is about diversity in our choices and our interests, and we should never be afraid to show who we truly are.

Harry Potter and The Twilight saga were the stories that hooked me on the YA genre though at first I remember feeling embarrassed that I was reading them, until I realized that I was not alone. I read the same survey quoted in the Slate article, where the analysis identified that fifty-five percent of people who purchase YA books are adults. I wasn’t in the least bit surprised.

Now, I don’t just read YA books, I am also a voracious reader of murder-mysteries/crime/suspense novels. Tess Gerritsen is one of my all-time favorite writers, alongside Patricia Cornwell, Kathy Reichs, and Michael Connelly, to name a few. I also read other adult genres; I’ve read a lot of the classics, plenty of corporate non-fiction books and I do not discriminate in my choices.  If I like the sound of a book or I have received a recommendation then I’ll read it.

However, there are certain times when all I want to read is YA. Because I love-love-love the action/adventure, kick-ass heroines, swoon-worthy romance, and the pure fantasy of the worlds created by some of my favorite YA authors. I don’t tend to read much contemporary YA stuff though I adore John Green’s TFIOS, and I disagree completely with Ruth Graham’s observations of this book in the Slate article. I found the dialog between Hazel and Gus to be very compelling, emotive and refreshing, and yes, it was a little cheesy at times, but I still loved it. Seriously, who doesn’t love a bit of cheese every now and then? Moreover, how is that ending a typical satisfactory ending? Or Allegiant’s ending? That had the entire Divergent fan base split right down the middle.

So if it’s seemingly wrong, as an adult, to read books ‘written for teenagers’ then does that logic apply to movies as well? Some of the greatest, and most successful, movies of all times have been children’s and teen movies. Back to the Future, Rebel without a Cause, ET, Harry Potter, etc., etc. Does going to see the latest Avengers Assemble movie with my children (one is a teenager) set a bad example? In the same way it’s suggested that my reading of Laini Taylor’s ‘Daughter of Smoke and Bone’ Trilogy or Jennifer L. Armentrout’s ‘Covenent Series’ would imply? To suggest, as Ruth Graham does in her article, that reading YA fiction sends out the wrong message to our teenage children, is absurd in my view. Surely the point is this: If children see their parents reading, they are more inclined to read themselves, irrespective of what genre the content is. Anything that encourages the youth of today to read more is a positive in my book (pardon the pun). Sharing some of the same reading material opens up opportunities for parents to engage in meaningful discussions with their children about these books, and to explore the issues/themes.

Rant almost over.

Some commentators have said that the writing quality in YA literature is questionable in the extreme. I disagree. While I do not pick up a YA book expecting it to be a literary work of art, I am often pleasantly surprised at the exceptional talent of so many who write in this genre. Many of these books surpass the quality of a lot of so called ‘adult literature’ that is out there in the market.

In my opinion, readers should be allowed to make their own decisions regarding books they choose to read, without risk of vilification. Because the pleasure of reading is what it is all about, and that is purely subjective. If we start expecting people to restrict their reading material, based on a narrow societal categorization of what’s deemed appropriate, then ultimately fewer people will read, and that is not a good thing.

Are you an adult who reads young adult books? If so we’d love to hear from you! What do you feel about all the controversy? Why do you enjoy reading YA books and what is it in particular that attracts you to this genre?